Culture JAM

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE INANIMATE OBJECT? from tumblrbot

I would have to say, my rocking chair. It’s antique, it’s oak, and it rocks!


Magna Carta One of the cornerstones of our culture, which, along with English common law, forms the basis for all of the individual rights and freedoms that we enjoy today.”Magna Carta, also called Magna Carta Libertatum or The Great Charter of the Liberties of England, is an English charter, originally issued in the year 1215 and reissued later in the 13th century in modified versions. The later versions excluded the most direct challenges to the monarch’s authority that had been present in the 1215 charter. The charter first passed into law in 1225; the 1297 version, with the long title (originally in Latin) “The Great Charter of the Liberties of England, and of the Liberties of the Forest,” still remains on the statute books of England and Wales.” (Source: Wikipedia)
Clicking on the image of the Magna Carta above will take you to the British Library’s website, where you can use their “Magna Carta Viewer” to view the original document, along with a transcription and English translation of the original Latin. View Larger

Magna Carta One of the cornerstones of our culture, which, along with English common law, forms the basis for all of the individual rights and freedoms that we enjoy today.

Magna Carta, also called Magna Carta Libertatum or The Great Charter of the Liberties of England, is an English charter, originally issued in the year 1215 and reissued later in the 13th century in modified versions. The later versions excluded the most direct challenges to the monarch’s authority that had been present in the 1215 charter. The charter first passed into law in 1225; the 1297 version, with the long title (originally in Latin) “The Great Charter of the Liberties of England, and of the Liberties of the Forest,” still remains on the statute books of England and Wales.” (Source: Wikipedia)

Clicking on the image of the Magna Carta above will take you to the British Library’s website, where you can use their “Magna Carta Viewer” to view the original document, along with a transcription and English translation of the original Latin.


Lewis Carroll collection, Thomas Fisher Rare Books Library, University of Toronto →

The Joseph Brabant Lewis Carroll Collection was donated to the Library in 1997 by Joseph Brabant and Nicholas Maes. It is one of the finest private collections focused on Carroll to have been in private hands, and is the largest and most valuable single-author collection in the Fisher Library. The collection contains first editions and related material by Lewis Carroll and Charles L. Dodgson, including long runs of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland from 1865 through to the end of the 1990s.


TED Conferences Drag Down Intellectuals, Glorify Smart-Style People →

Daily Beast logo"TED arose out of a genuine necessity, a need for technogeeks to talk to one another. But within a decade or so, the dawn of the TED Era began, and we saw a change—Steve Jobs and those guys migrated from their bookish nerdery (I mean, what was DOS, anyhow?) and found themselves at the very height of hip, combining the vision thing, big bucks, and scientific brilliance in a field none of us could master. So one by one, they crawled like heliotropic bugs to the light—the TED spotlight that is—bringing with them the Nobel laureates and presidents and all the others who wanted a free tutorial on operating their laptop."


Those who read, read a lot, and those that don’t, don’t.

I read somewhere recently that a large percentage of US college graduates (meaning 4-year university) never read another book once out in the “real” world.  I imagine the same holds true here in Canada.  But those that DO read, read a lot, at least in Toronto, which has the most used municipal public library system in the world.  No book-burning here.  Oh, Rob and Doug Ford [mayor of Toronto and his councilor brother] excepted, that is.  Who knows what they would do if they got their hands on a book.  They might not burn it.  More likely, they’d eat it or use it for toilet paper. Actually, pulp paperbacks and comic books are best for that; although I’m glad I didn’t use my Spider Man comics that way—I sold the Doc Octopus one, at the time that the movie came out, for $900.00.  Paid 35 cents for it.  Best 35 cents I ever spent!


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